Topics Archives: Disaster Recovery

Impacts from System-Wide Suppression of Derogatory Data in Credit Reporting

This forthcoming study examines a proposed approach to credit reporting in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The relative narrow and targeted credit reporting response from the CARES Act appears to have been largely successful. However, there were calls by some members of Congress for an outright system-wide ban on credit reporting any adverse information, covering all consumers during (and for some period after) the COVID-19 crisis—a policy referred to as “suppression and deletion.” This research uses 5 million credit records from 2011 and 2017 to simulate the impact on credit scores and, more importantly, on consumer access to credit if the large-scale suppression and deletion policy were implemented.

Addition is Better than Subtraction: The Risks from Data Suppression and the Benefits of Adding More Positive Data in Credit Reporting

This report looks at the potential impacts of negative credit data suppression or deletion measures during the COVID-19 pandemic period. While the proposed measures are well-intended, they harm more consumers than they help. Instead, the report recommends adding positive telecommunications payments to make the system fairer and more forgiving, giving consumers a chance to rebuild their credit history, since negative telecommunications data is already reported. This solution also protects the integrity of the national credit reporting system, vital for post-pandemic economic recovery.

PERC Research Findings for COVID-19 Economic Recovery Efforts

PERC has conducted years of research on disaster recovery (following major hurricanes, such as Katrina, Rita, and Wilma in 2005), credit access for lower income Americans, and credit reporting in general. This white paper discusses those findings and draws lessons for the economic recovery phase of the current COVID-19 crisis.

Louisiana Small Businesses Five Years Post-Katrina: Assessing LDRF Program Impacts And Measuring Existing Needs

This report examines the continuing impact of Hurricane Katrina and other disasters on small businesses and the self-employed in Louisiana. Primary to this research was an examination of the impacts of aid received from the Community Development Organizations (CDOs) funded in part by the Louisiana Disaster Recovery Foundation (LDRF) as well as aid received from other sources. It also examines the extent of existing unmet needs of small businesses in Louisiana. For this research PERC surveyed over 1,600 small business operators and analyzed data from tens of thousands of Experian small business credit files.

Recovering But Not Recovered: Gulf Coast Businesses Three Years Later

This is a follow-up to the 2007 small business survey and provides further insight as to the progress of recovery from the hurricanes of 2005. As with the 2007 survey, this year’s survey asked small business owners and operators about the changing state of their business since the 2005 hurricanes, and since August of 2007.

Recovery, Renewal, and Resiliency: Gulf Coast Small Businesses Two Years Later

The first PERC survey of small businesses in New Orleans and other FEMA-declared disaster areas in the wake of the 2005 hurricanes finds disparate impacts among different segments of business owners. The results also yield insights into the efficacy of existing recovery policy, and identify policy shortcomings and unmet needs.